Queens Land

1st March 2014

Queens Land is an amusement park that appears to have been built almost entirely from second hand rides purchased from the fair circuit in Europe. The result is a treasure trove of unique attractions, including several that to the best of my knowledge have no direct equivalents anywhere else in the world. Admission is by a wristband that grants a single ride on each attraction, and there is no way to purchase additional rides inside the park.

Alpenblitz

The late Anton Schwarzkopf built a number of powered coasters, but only one remains operational worldwide as of this writing. Alpenblitz feels a little dated, but is still a decent ride conveying "the thrill of driving in the alps, with sharp turns from side to side". It was interesting to see a white flag attached to the front car of the train; I can't think of any other coaster that has something like this.

Roller Coaster (#2026) is also enjoyable, though a certain amount of patience is required as the loading process is very slow. Two guests are loaded in cars that would easily hold four in an inline arrangement, and only two cars are allowed on circuit at once. The queueing area is narrow and respect for personal space is conspicuous by its absence.

The park has a lengthy cable car ride that traverses a lake and much of the ride area before turning around and returning to its start point. The gondolas have plexiglas roofs that reduce the view somewhat, but presumably they come in handy during the rainy season. The turnaround looks like it was once intended to be a second station, but it contains clear signage saying landing not allowed here and a very bored looking operator to make sure that nobody tries to disembark anyway.

It was a bit disappointing to see the Fun House restricted to ladies and children only. The reason for this was unclear, as the ride appeared to be a fairly standard travelling model and Queens Land isn't located in the Middle East. Fortunately the Mirror House and Dark House were open to all. The latter was originally a travelling ride named Indiana Jones, and the standard of theming was well above what I'd expected from looking at the exterior.

While I didn't ride it myself, I spent a bit of time watching Crazy Horse, a very odd looking flat ride with a number of carnival horses rotating and rocking back in forth in time to music. The motions were not dissimilar to those of the rotating bull rides found at parks around the world, albeit at a slower speed so as to not throw riders.

The park has a Go Kart ride that has considerable potential, but falls somewhat short due to the way it is operated. The initial acceleration outside of the pit lane was weak, but picked up rapidly and the top speed was well beyond what I'd have anticipated from a free attraction. Unfortunately, visitors are only given a single lap, lasting no more than twenty seconds, and that really isn't long enough to appreciate something like this. It's also worth noting that a one size fits all helmet is required for all drivers, and my one didn't smell very good.

Queens Tower

My favourite ride in the park was Queens Tower, a strange looking drop ride that travelled Europe in the late 1990s under the name Trueno. It features a central tower supporting two twelve seat cars, one on either side, which are operated independently. The park was using both during busy periods, and alternating sides at other points in the day. Riders were being given two drops, one from the half way point, and one from the top, and both provided a nice pop of airtime. Given how much fun this ride is I'm a bit surprised that no other versions exist. This one still has the original trailer and vehicle license plate, though one presumes that it is now in its final resting place.

We decided to queue for Space Car, a ride that looked from the ground like it might qualify as a powered coaster. However, it is better described as a dark ride without the dark bits; the experience felt fully controlled at all times. On disembarking we went to look at the Simulator but decided to forego it on seeing the length of the queue.