Tivoli Gardens

2nd May 2004

Tivoli Gardens

Our morning was due to start with an exclusive session on Daemonen, but the ride was suffering from technical difficulties. The problem was apparently something to do with the ride programming, as might be expected on such a new attraction. Park management had come up with a fantastic alternative, however; we were allowed the opportunity to explore the layout of the Rutschebanen on foot. I managed to get through about two thirds of the track length, a surprisingly energetic and challenging task given the steepness of some of the hills. Given a bit more time I'd have finished it, but the group wanted to get some rides in, and that was that.

It was at the end of my second lap that the announcement came through that Daemonen was now open. The staff decided to keep their ride closed to the public for almost half an hour, allowing us the promised exclusive time. This was utterly unnecessary given the earlier experience on the scenic railway, but nevertheless very much appreciated by all present. There was enough time for me to get in six back to back rides, which was pretty close to the limit of what I'd have been able to take even had the session not drawn to a close.

The only negative point about the entire morning was the loss of the coaster we'd missed last night; the Karavanen, was not due to open until 2:00pm. The same was true of Det gyldne Tårn and the Monsunen. The only interesting ride that was open was the Tempeltårnet, a self propelled tower ride similar to the one we saw in Legoland Windsor on Friday. While unusual, it didn't do a whole lot for me other than providing a good angle to get some more photos of Daemonen. In the end I elected to conclude the morning with a few more laps on the big coasters.

 

BonBon-Land

2nd May 2004

BonBon-Land

BonBon-Land is a little over an hour by road from Tivoli Gardens, but it is sufficiently different that it might as well be in a parallel universe. Tivoli Gardens has over a hundred years of tradition behind it, and is known for its architecture and fine food. BonBon-Land, on the other hand, has a flatulent dog as its mascot. One need say no more.

Due to an unfortunate mistake in planning our trip organisers arranged for us to visit this park when it was scheduled to be closed. This error was only caught after flights had been booked, which was needless to say somewhat less than ideal. Fortunately park management were very accommodating, arranging for their two newest rides to be open just for us. These were naturally enough the ones that most of the group were interested in, including the first ever roller coaster to feature a drop that goes beyond vertical.

One can hardly be surprised therefore that the entire group made a direct line for the aforementioned ride. The park manager advised us before boarding that new wheels had recently been fitted to the Vild-Svinet (#237), resulting in a slight increase in top speed to 74km/h. Other than that though there had been no changes to the ride since opening; it seems that Gerstlauer is a company that can get its prototype designs right first time.

The first question anyone asks about these coasters is whether riders actually feel like they are going beyond vertical. The short answer is yes; the drop on this coaster is simply superb; leagues ahead of any other ride of this height, and a candidate for one of the best first drops on any steel coaster. The rest of the ride was fun if not particularly memorable; the highlight was definitely that first drop. Over the course of the rest of the day I was lucky enough to enjoy it a total of twenty times, and I'd have happily done more. I was quoted later in the evening on local television talking about how good the ride was, possibly the only time in my life I'll ever be subtitled in Danish!

The other open ride was the new Disk-O, here named Alba-Tossen. While interesting, I don't have the stomach to marathon on spin rides, so once was enough.

Before leaving the park the whole group walked around together, exploring the park thoroughly. While no rides were operational, we did manage to find a self-powered pirate ship ride called the Cowboy Gigantgynge. This seems like a good idea until you have a load of coaster enthusiasts on board. We were swinging it very high indeed, and I suspect we might well have frightened the regular guests if the park had been open to the public!